PhD Studentship: Bioinspired Optical Sensors: developing a nanofabrication method to produce slante

Location
United Kingdom
Posted
Dec 21, 2017
Closes
Mar 20, 2018
Organization Type
University and College
Hours
Full Time
Details

Dynamic structural coloration in Tmesisternus isabellae beetle elytra and Morpho butterflies are unique examples of Bragg stack-based wavelength tuning in response to external stimuli. The underlying principles could guide the design of quantitative optical stimuli-responsive polymers. Existing nanofabrication techniques to create such materials are costly, time-consuming, and require expertise.

The aim of this project is to develop a nanofabrication method to produce slanted Bragg stack structures in hydrogel films by combining laser interference lithography and silver halide chemistry in a cost-effective and rapid process. The Bragg stacks will consist of silver bromide nanocrystal multilayers. Upon broadband light illumination, the Bragg stacks will diffract a narrow-band peak. To demonstrate the utility of this method, the Bragg stacks will be functionalised with analyte-sensitive molecules. The developed Bragg stacks may have application in portable, wearable, and implantable real-time medical diagnostics at point-of-care settings.

The successful student will form part of a multidisciplinary team and will be supervised by Dr. Ali K. Yetisen based in the Institute of Translational Medicine (www.itmbirmingham.co.uk) and the School of Chemical Engineering at the University of Birmingham.

 

Funding Notes

Students must have an undergraduate degree or master’s degree in engineering, chemistry, physics, materials science or a closely related subject.

University of Birmingham scholarships are available for exceptional UK/EU students. Self-funded international students are welcome to apply this post. Applications will be evaluated on an on-going basis until the position is filled.

 

References

Laser Interference Lithography for the Nanofabrication of Stimuli-Responsive Bragg Stacks. Advanced Functional Materials. DOI: 10.1002/adfm.201702715 (2018)