PhD Studentship: The breakdown of neurovascular coupling in the diseased state specifically Epileps

Expiring today

Location
United Kingdom
Posted
Jan 10, 2018
Closes
Feb 24, 2018
Organization Type
University and College
Hours
Full Time
Details

Epilepsy is the most common neurological condition in the UK, affecting 1 – 2 % of the population. Epilepsies often involve only a small area of the brain - the epileptic focus – and the abnormal activity can propagate out from there. Although surgery is often curative in epilepsy, effective intervention relies on the correct identification of the location of the epileptic focus. Current pre-operative techniques are of limited use in this regard, but the new generation of imaging techniques based on changes in blood perfusion of active areas offer great promise. However, we currently have very little understanding of how epilepsy affects the relationship between brain activity and perfusion. Our research will use state of the art techniques in an animal model of epilepsy to characterise, define and measure the relationship between activity and perfusion in the epileptic state. We will also assess whether any long term changes in this relationship persist after epileptic activity, and whether antiepileptic medication can return the relationship to normal. The research we propose will develop the use of imaging techniques as a tool for pre-surgical localization of epileptic foci in epilepsy and ultimately improve outcomes for surgical interventions on human epilepsy patients.

Research Groups Involved: Dr Berwick, Dr A. J. Kennerley, Prof Overton, Dr CHUANG Kai-Hsiang – Singapore Bioimaging consortium

 

Funding Notes

This is one of many projects in competition for the current funding opportunities available within the Department of Psychology. Please see here for full details: http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/psychology/prospectivepg/funding

Overseas students are welcome to apply for funding but must be able to demonstrate that they can fund the difference in the tuition fees.

Requirements: We ask for a minimum of a first class or high upper second-class undergraduate honours degree and a distinction or high merit at Masters level in psychology or a related discipline.